The Matcha Alternatives Blog

 

For the rational tea drinker:

A fully referenced, anti-pseudoscience exploration into the glorious world of tea science. We publish 2-3 times per month, with posts ranging from cool tea science to delicious recipes to how to have fun with tea!

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5 Best Tea + Song Combos to Lower Stress and Boost Your Mood

Posted by Lauren Leese on

Music inspires emotion, but wouldn't it be even better if we could taste the music? Try our 5 pairings of teas + songs to help improve your mood and energy. If you're wondering how to feel relaxed, energetic, focused, confident or simply happy, these music and tea choices are here for you!

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5 Best Tea + Song Combos to Lower Stress and Boost Your Mood

Posted by Lauren Leese on

Music inspires emotion, but wouldn't it be even better if we could taste the music? Try our 5 pairings of teas + songs to help improve your mood and energy. If you're wondering how to feel relaxed, energetic, focused, confident or simply happy, these music and tea choices are here for you!

Read more


Best Substitutes for Matcha Tea...for Concentration, Caffeine & Antioxidants

Posted by Elizabeth Taeed on

For all those matcha lovers (or haters) out there: This blog covers the best alternatives to matcha for those who are looking for concentration and focus; a morning caffeine hit; or loads of antioxidants. With direct price, antioxidant and caffeine comparisons to matcha so you can make up your own mind!

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For all those matcha lovers (or haters) out there: This blog covers the best alternatives to matcha for those who are looking for concentration and focus; a morning caffeine hit; or loads of antioxidants. With direct price, antioxidant and caffeine comparisons to matcha so you can make up your own mind!

Read more


Tulsi Holy Basil: An Ancient Tea for Modern Times

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Tulsi Holy Basil is a famous herb and tisane in the herbal medicine philosophy of India called Ayurveda. True to its title as “adaptogen”, Tulsi can be taken safely as a tonic (a fancy way to say drinking a tea or tisane for health purposes) over long periods of time and has virtually no side-effects. Holy Basil revitalizes, increases endurance and energizes, yet contains no caffeine. Furthermore, it contains phytochemicals that exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and has even shown protective action for human blood lymphocytes by reducing chromosomal damage due to radiation. It's a pretty incredible tea!

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Tulsi Holy Basil: An Ancient Tea for Modern Times

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Tulsi Holy Basil is a famous herb and tisane in the herbal medicine philosophy of India called Ayurveda. True to its title as “adaptogen”, Tulsi can be taken safely as a tonic (a fancy way to say drinking a tea or tisane for health purposes) over long periods of time and has virtually no side-effects. Holy Basil revitalizes, increases endurance and energizes, yet contains no caffeine. Furthermore, it contains phytochemicals that exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and has even shown protective action for human blood lymphocytes by reducing chromosomal damage due to radiation. It's a pretty incredible tea!

Read more


A Tea & Tisane Primer (Everything You Need to Know About Tea and 'Tea')

Posted by Elizabeth Taeed on

Tea is simply dried leaves from one specific type of evergreen: a type of camellia. Its Latin name is Camellia var. sinensis and there are two varieties: Camellia sinensis var. sinensis (translates to the Chinese Chinese camellia) and Camellia sinensis var. assamica (the Indian Chinese camellia). Any other plant that has been steeped in hot water and turned into a drink is an ‘infusion’ or ‘tisane’, not tea. Common (and delicious) infusions include rooibos, mate and all the plants you can think of (chamomile, mint, liquorice, orange, lavender, vanilla, raspberry, and so on). Most of the ‘teas’ at Matcha Alternatives are not actually teas, but tisanes.

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Tea is simply dried leaves from one specific type of evergreen: a type of camellia. Its Latin name is Camellia var. sinensis and there are two varieties: Camellia sinensis var. sinensis (translates to the Chinese Chinese camellia) and Camellia sinensis var. assamica (the Indian Chinese camellia). Any other plant that has been steeped in hot water and turned into a drink is an ‘infusion’ or ‘tisane’, not tea. Common (and delicious) infusions include rooibos, mate and all the plants you can think of (chamomile, mint, liquorice, orange, lavender, vanilla, raspberry, and so on). Most of the ‘teas’ at Matcha Alternatives are not actually teas, but tisanes.

Read more


Adaptogens Part 2: What Foods and Teas Contain Adaptogens?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Adaptogens improve the adaptability of the body, regardless of the origin of the stressor (physiological, psychological, environmental, or situational), and increases its resistance threshold. In doing so, they improve organ function and hormone regulation. A brief breakdown would be to consider the Ginsengs as stimulating, Tulsi is calming, and Ashwagandha and Moringa can act in both ways (while also replenishing a deficient and depleted system). 

Read more

Adaptogens Part 2: What Foods and Teas Contain Adaptogens?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Adaptogens improve the adaptability of the body, regardless of the origin of the stressor (physiological, psychological, environmental, or situational), and increases its resistance threshold. In doing so, they improve organ function and hormone regulation. A brief breakdown would be to consider the Ginsengs as stimulating, Tulsi is calming, and Ashwagandha and Moringa can act in both ways (while also replenishing a deficient and depleted system). 

Read more