The Matcha Alternatives Blog

 

For the rational tea drinker:

A fully referenced, anti-pseudoscience exploration into the glorious world of tea science. We publish 2-3 times per month, with posts ranging from cool tea science to delicious recipes to how to have fun with tea!

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What is Purple Tea? All About the Mega-Antioxidant, Anthocyanin-Rich Matcha Alternative

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

What is purple tea? Why is it becoming so popular? Today's post dives in to what tea cultivars produce purple tea, how it differs from green tea, the difference between Chinese vs Kenyan purple tea, its antioxidant levels and why you should give it a try!

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What is purple tea? Why is it becoming so popular? Today's post dives in to what tea cultivars produce purple tea, how it differs from green tea, the difference between Chinese vs Kenyan purple tea, its antioxidant levels and why you should give it a try!

Read more


Moringa: The Complete Vegan Protein

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Of the 20 dietarily relevant amino acids, 11 are non-essential, which means our body can make them. But the rest must come from the diet. These other 9 are found together in animal proteins. Which is great - unless you are vegan. Enter Moringa! This miracle plant contains a whopping 17 amino acids, and all 9 essential amino acids, making it one of the very rare complete proteins in the plant world.

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Moringa: The Complete Vegan Protein

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Of the 20 dietarily relevant amino acids, 11 are non-essential, which means our body can make them. But the rest must come from the diet. These other 9 are found together in animal proteins. Which is great - unless you are vegan. Enter Moringa! This miracle plant contains a whopping 17 amino acids, and all 9 essential amino acids, making it one of the very rare complete proteins in the plant world.

Read more


Calming Chamomile Part 2: What is German Chamomile?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

The sweet, apple-scented chamomile flower, or as the Greeks called it “The Ground Apple”, has been a staple of medicine since the time of Hippocrates in 500 B.C. When sipped hot, German chamomile relieves indigestion. This adaptogen acts on the nervous system to soothe the gastrointestinal tract and reduce nervousness and its mild sedative action makes it an excellent bedtime beverage. This post takes a deeper look at what it is and does.

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Calming Chamomile Part 2: What is German Chamomile?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

The sweet, apple-scented chamomile flower, or as the Greeks called it “The Ground Apple”, has been a staple of medicine since the time of Hippocrates in 500 B.C. When sipped hot, German chamomile relieves indigestion. This adaptogen acts on the nervous system to soothe the gastrointestinal tract and reduce nervousness and its mild sedative action makes it an excellent bedtime beverage. This post takes a deeper look at what it is and does.

Read more


Japanese and Chinese Green Teas: A Brief Introduction

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

If you love tea, you may (or may not) know that green tea is most famously produced in Japan and China. The practice of drinking green tea for medicinal purposes began in China and the first recorded use was 4,000 years ago! This Spotlight introduces Japanese and Chinese green teas, the main health benefits of green tea in general, and how to drink it. 

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Japanese and Chinese Green Teas: A Brief Introduction

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

If you love tea, you may (or may not) know that green tea is most famously produced in Japan and China. The practice of drinking green tea for medicinal purposes began in China and the first recorded use was 4,000 years ago! This Spotlight introduces Japanese and Chinese green teas, the main health benefits of green tea in general, and how to drink it. 

Read more


Tulsi Holy Basil: An Ancient Tea for Modern Times

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Tulsi Holy Basil is a famous herb and tisane in the herbal medicine philosophy of India called Ayurveda. True to its title as “adaptogen”, Tulsi can be taken safely as a tonic (a fancy way to say drinking a tea or tisane for health purposes) over long periods of time and has virtually no side-effects. Holy Basil revitalizes, increases endurance and energizes, yet contains no caffeine. Furthermore, it contains phytochemicals that exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and has even shown protective action for human blood lymphocytes by reducing chromosomal damage due to radiation. It's a pretty incredible tea!

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Tulsi Holy Basil: An Ancient Tea for Modern Times

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Tulsi Holy Basil is a famous herb and tisane in the herbal medicine philosophy of India called Ayurveda. True to its title as “adaptogen”, Tulsi can be taken safely as a tonic (a fancy way to say drinking a tea or tisane for health purposes) over long periods of time and has virtually no side-effects. Holy Basil revitalizes, increases endurance and energizes, yet contains no caffeine. Furthermore, it contains phytochemicals that exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and has even shown protective action for human blood lymphocytes by reducing chromosomal damage due to radiation. It's a pretty incredible tea!

Read more