The Matcha Alternatives Blog

Your new favorite source of information about antioxidant-rich teas and tisanes

What Are Tea Blends? How Do They Compare to Pure Teas?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Tea comes in all types, tastes and varieties, but it will always be either a ‘pure tea’ or a ‘blended tea’. This post examines the world of pures and blends, and then puts blends under the microscope in terms of whether something that tastes like a liquid dessert can also be healthy, and what the science is around tea blends.

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What Are Tea Blends? How Do They Compare to Pure Teas?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Tea comes in all types, tastes and varieties, but it will always be either a ‘pure tea’ or a ‘blended tea’. This post examines the world of pures and blends, and then puts blends under the microscope in terms of whether something that tastes like a liquid dessert can also be healthy, and what the science is around tea blends.

Read more


What are “Natural Flavors”?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Have you ever read the ingredient lists on packaged foods and wondered, “What on earth are ‘natural’ flavors?” The term is incredibly vague! So, don your chemistry caps, grab a cup of tea and get ready to explore! In this piece we'll provide an intro into how natural flavors come about, why they are added and what MatchaAlternatives.com uses ourselves.

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What are “Natural Flavors”?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Have you ever read the ingredient lists on packaged foods and wondered, “What on earth are ‘natural’ flavors?” The term is incredibly vague! So, don your chemistry caps, grab a cup of tea and get ready to explore! In this piece we'll provide an intro into how natural flavors come about, why they are added and what MatchaAlternatives.com uses ourselves.

Read more


Tulsi Holy Basil: An Ancient Tea for Modern Times

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Tulsi Holy Basil is a famous herb and tisane in the herbal medicine philosophy of India called Ayurveda. True to its title as “adaptogen”, Tulsi can be taken safely as a tonic (a fancy way to say drinking a tea or tisane for health purposes) over long periods of time and has virtually no side-effects. Holy Basil revitalizes, increases endurance and energizes, yet contains no caffeine. Furthermore, it contains phytochemicals that exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and has even shown protective action for human blood lymphocytes by reducing chromosomal damage due to radiation. It's a pretty incredible tea!

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Tulsi Holy Basil: An Ancient Tea for Modern Times

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Tulsi Holy Basil is a famous herb and tisane in the herbal medicine philosophy of India called Ayurveda. True to its title as “adaptogen”, Tulsi can be taken safely as a tonic (a fancy way to say drinking a tea or tisane for health purposes) over long periods of time and has virtually no side-effects. Holy Basil revitalizes, increases endurance and energizes, yet contains no caffeine. Furthermore, it contains phytochemicals that exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and has even shown protective action for human blood lymphocytes by reducing chromosomal damage due to radiation. It's a pretty incredible tea!

Read more


What Are Antioxidants and How Do They Work?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Antioxidants are properties attributed to certain vitamins and compounds that pair with free radicals. Free radicals are molecules with an oxygen atom that has an unpaired electron. They come from a variety of sources, from foods to sunlight to cigarette smoke and pollutants. These unpaired electrons need another electron to become stable, so they steal from the nearest molecule. When this happens, oxidative stress occurs and alters the structure and function of the molecule which lost the electron and can result in signs of ageing, increased susceptibility to/progression of disease, and even DNA damage. Antioxidants help by swooping in and donating an electron to the electron-hungry free radical hedging to steal one from unsuspecting victims. When this donation occurs, the free radical is satisfied and its potential for damage is neutralized. The antioxidant acted by preventing oxidative stress from occurring. Diets rich in antioxidants from natural sources, e.g. berries, plants, tea, etc., means lower disease incidence. 

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What Are Antioxidants and How Do They Work?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Antioxidants are properties attributed to certain vitamins and compounds that pair with free radicals. Free radicals are molecules with an oxygen atom that has an unpaired electron. They come from a variety of sources, from foods to sunlight to cigarette smoke and pollutants. These unpaired electrons need another electron to become stable, so they steal from the nearest molecule. When this happens, oxidative stress occurs and alters the structure and function of the molecule which lost the electron and can result in signs of ageing, increased susceptibility to/progression of disease, and even DNA damage. Antioxidants help by swooping in and donating an electron to the electron-hungry free radical hedging to steal one from unsuspecting victims. When this donation occurs, the free radical is satisfied and its potential for damage is neutralized. The antioxidant acted by preventing oxidative stress from occurring. Diets rich in antioxidants from natural sources, e.g. berries, plants, tea, etc., means lower disease incidence. 

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Adaptogens Part 2: What Foods and Teas Contain Adaptogens?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Adaptogens improve the adaptability of the body, regardless of the origin of the stressor (physiological, psychological, environmental, or situational), and increases its resistance threshold. In doing so, they improve organ function and hormone regulation. A brief breakdown would be to consider the Ginsengs as stimulating, Tulsi is calming, and Ashwagandha and Moringa can act in both ways (while also replenishing a deficient and depleted system). 

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Adaptogens Part 2: What Foods and Teas Contain Adaptogens?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Adaptogens improve the adaptability of the body, regardless of the origin of the stressor (physiological, psychological, environmental, or situational), and increases its resistance threshold. In doing so, they improve organ function and hormone regulation. A brief breakdown would be to consider the Ginsengs as stimulating, Tulsi is calming, and Ashwagandha and Moringa can act in both ways (while also replenishing a deficient and depleted system). 

Read more