The Matcha Alternatives Blog

Your new favorite source of information about antioxidant-rich teas and tisanes

Ultimate Guide to Brewing Tea and Tisanes

Posted by Elizabeth Taeed on

The difference between a great cup of tea and something that is best for watering plants is down to three key factors: time, temperature and quantity. Always make sure your tea doesn't over- or under-brew, that your water is the right temperature (some teas taste best in boiling water, whereas others will burn), and that you have used enough tea (to your taste!). Each tea and tisane is slightly different, so follow the below instructions carefully and you will have a gorgeous brew every time.

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Ultimate Guide to Brewing Tea and Tisanes

Posted by Elizabeth Taeed on

The difference between a great cup of tea and something that is best for watering plants is down to three key factors: time, temperature and quantity. Always make sure your tea doesn't over- or under-brew, that your water is the right temperature (some teas taste best in boiling water, whereas others will burn), and that you have used enough tea (to your taste!). Each tea and tisane is slightly different, so follow the below instructions carefully and you will have a gorgeous brew every time.

Read more


The Dark Truth About Matcha Tea

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Matcha green tea powder has exploded in Western markets over the past decade, as its superfood reputation spreads. However, is it all it's cracked up to be? Is it truly king of the healthy drinks when consumers are going to Starbucks and drinking matcha lattes that are 50% sugar? It's also fiercely expensive, at up to $3 for a mug, at home! Is it the high antioxidant claims that have led to the title of king? The nutrient profile? There are MANY herbs that beat matcha by a long shot. Consider Moringa: this plant is also a preparation of ground leaves that are whisked into water and enjoyed similarly to matcha. Let’s also compare Rooibos and Honeybush, who are also strong contenders.

Read more

The Dark Truth About Matcha Tea

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Matcha green tea powder has exploded in Western markets over the past decade, as its superfood reputation spreads. However, is it all it's cracked up to be? Is it truly king of the healthy drinks when consumers are going to Starbucks and drinking matcha lattes that are 50% sugar? It's also fiercely expensive, at up to $3 for a mug, at home! Is it the high antioxidant claims that have led to the title of king? The nutrient profile? There are MANY herbs that beat matcha by a long shot. Consider Moringa: this plant is also a preparation of ground leaves that are whisked into water and enjoyed similarly to matcha. Let’s also compare Rooibos and Honeybush, who are also strong contenders.

Read more


A Tea & Tisane Primer (Everything You Need to Know About Tea and 'Tea')

Posted by Elizabeth Taeed on

Tea is simply dried leaves from one specific type of evergreen: a type of camellia. Its Latin name is Camellia var. sinensis and there are two varieties: Camellia sinensis var. sinensis (translates to the Chinese Chinese camellia) and Camellia sinensis var. assamica (the Indian Chinese camellia). Any other plant that has been steeped in hot water and turned into a drink is an ‘infusion’ or ‘tisane’, not tea. Common (and delicious) infusions include rooibos, mate and all the plants you can think of (chamomile, mint, liquorice, orange, lavender, vanilla, raspberry, and so on). Most of the ‘teas’ at Matcha Alternatives are not actually teas, but tisanes.

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Tea is simply dried leaves from one specific type of evergreen: a type of camellia. Its Latin name is Camellia var. sinensis and there are two varieties: Camellia sinensis var. sinensis (translates to the Chinese Chinese camellia) and Camellia sinensis var. assamica (the Indian Chinese camellia). Any other plant that has been steeped in hot water and turned into a drink is an ‘infusion’ or ‘tisane’, not tea. Common (and delicious) infusions include rooibos, mate and all the plants you can think of (chamomile, mint, liquorice, orange, lavender, vanilla, raspberry, and so on). Most of the ‘teas’ at Matcha Alternatives are not actually teas, but tisanes.

Read more


Adaptogens Part 2: What Foods and Teas Contain Adaptogens?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Adaptogens improve the adaptability of the body, regardless of the origin of the stressor (physiological, psychological, environmental, or situational), and increases its resistance threshold. In doing so, they improve organ function and hormone regulation. A brief breakdown would be to consider the Ginsengs as stimulating, Tulsi is calming, and Ashwagandha and Moringa can act in both ways (while also replenishing a deficient and depleted system). 

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Adaptogens Part 2: What Foods and Teas Contain Adaptogens?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Adaptogens improve the adaptability of the body, regardless of the origin of the stressor (physiological, psychological, environmental, or situational), and increases its resistance threshold. In doing so, they improve organ function and hormone regulation. A brief breakdown would be to consider the Ginsengs as stimulating, Tulsi is calming, and Ashwagandha and Moringa can act in both ways (while also replenishing a deficient and depleted system). 

Read more


Adaptogens Part 1: What Are They and How Do They Work?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Adaptogens might be a funny sounding word, but they are relatively straightforward. In short, Adaptogens are a relatively new class of herbs that help us “adapt” to stress, regardless of the origin of the stressor. They regulate and modulate hormone production, organ function, cell health and immune function. These plants are “intuitive” and it is said that the more you need them the more they will work, the less you need them the less they will work. For example: A person with low blood sugar and a person with high blood pressure could both take therapeutic amounts of adaptogens and see their blood sugar balance out!

Read more

Adaptogens Part 1: What Are They and How Do They Work?

Posted by Stephany Morgan on

Adaptogens might be a funny sounding word, but they are relatively straightforward. In short, Adaptogens are a relatively new class of herbs that help us “adapt” to stress, regardless of the origin of the stressor. They regulate and modulate hormone production, organ function, cell health and immune function. These plants are “intuitive” and it is said that the more you need them the more they will work, the less you need them the less they will work. For example: A person with low blood sugar and a person with high blood pressure could both take therapeutic amounts of adaptogens and see their blood sugar balance out!

Read more